Texas Wildfires: 50 Things You Can Do to Protect Your Home

Here is some helpful and timely information from the Texas Forest Service. I won’t list all 50 things here, but please click on the link either at the top or the bottom of the page for the complete list. I think I’m going to go out and get a NOAA Weather Alert radio today. It never occurred to me that they announce different types of emergencies.

50 Things You Can Do To Protect Your Home 

No Cost, Just A Little Time

• Move your firewood pile out to your home’s defensible space.

• Perform a FIREWISE assessment of your home.

• Clean your roof and gutters of leaves and pine needles.

• Clear the view of your house number so it can be easily seen from the street.

• Put a hose on a rack and attach it to an outside faucet.

• Trim all tree branches if they overhang your house.

• Trim all tree branches from within 20′ of all chimneys.

• Remove trees along the driveway to make it 12′ wide.

• Prune branches overhanging the driveway to have 14′ overhead clearance.

• Maintain a green lawn for 30′ around your home.

• If new homes are still being built in your area, talk to the developer and local

zoning officials about building standards.

• Plan and discuss an escape plan with your family, have practice drills, and include

your pets.

• Get involved with your community’s disaster mitigation plans.

• Check your fire extinguishers.  Are they still charged?  Are they easy to get to in

an emergency?  Does everyone in the family know where they are and how to use

them?

• Clear deadwood and dense flammable vegetation from your home’s defensible

space.

• Remove conifer shrubs from your home’s defensible space especially if your

home is in a high-risk area.

• Review your homeowner’s insurance policy for adequate coverage.

• Talk to your children about not starting fires or playing with matches.

• If you have a burn barrel that you use for burning trash, STOP!

• Compost leaves in the fall, don’t burn them.

• If you burn your brush piles or grass in the spring, get a burning permit.

• Always have a shovel on hand and hook up the garden hose BEFORE you start a

fire.

• Never burn if the smoke and flames are blowing towards your home (or your

neighbor’s home).

• Be a Firewise advocate.

For the complete list, please go to the Texas Forest Service website.


About M.J.Deare

I am a writer, actively researching topics of interest. I am also a graduate of the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, with a degree in English, and have a master's degree from the University of Memphis. Born in New Orleans, I lived there until moving to northwest Arkansas and from there to Memphis, Tennessee. My husband and I currently reside in The Woodlands, Texas.
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